big island | volcanoes

Imagine peering into the glowing cauldron of an active volcano, then summiting a 13,000-foot mountain, and later catwalking atop cliffs that plunge into an impossibly blue sea. It's all in a day's work—or rather, play—at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on the "Big Island" of Hawaii. Hawaii Volcanoes encompasses 209,695 acres and an astoundingly diverse landscape. The altitude in the park ranges from sea level to the summit of the earth's most massive volcano, 13,677-foot Mauna Loa. Kilauea, the world's most active volcano, offers scientists insights on the birth of the Hawaiian Islands and visitors views of dramatic volcanic landscapes. Arid deserts exist within a few miles of lush forests. Both beckon the adventurous explorer.

Volcano Watch - Volcano Watch is a weekly newsletter written by the scientists at the US Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. It is published in the Hawaii Tribune-Herald's Sunday newspaper and the West Hawai'i Today's Monday newspaper, and posted here the following Monday or Tuesday.

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Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park - The park encompasses 333,000 acres and ranges from sea level to the summit of the earth's most massive volcano, Mauna Loa at 13,677 feet. Kilauea, the world's most active volcano, offers scientists insights on the birth of the Hawaiian Islands and visitors views of dramatic volcanic landscapes. Over half of the park is designated wilderness and provides unique hiking and camping opportunities.

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Hawaiian Volcano Observatory - The activity on Pulama pali is slowly dying away. This morning a single, rather broad stream stretches down the pali from about tht 1500-foot elevation for about 1 km all the way to about 700 feet.

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Hawaii Center for Volcanology - Recent Highlights from the "Pu`u `O`o" eruption of Kilauea's East Rift Zone

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